Pork Tenderloin Diane

Pork Tenderloin Diane

I picked up a pork tenderloin from the store and went in search of a quick and simple recipe online. I found this one at Allrecipes that looked perfect. I couldn’t believe how fast this was to prepare and how delicious it was. This is a dish worthy of company and so easy too! We all thought the pork was very tender and the sauce made it extra delicious. I served it with rice and a tossed salad for a healthy and delicious meal.

Pork Tenderloin Diane

Remove the silverskin from the pork tenderloin (click this link for instructions). Cut the tenderloin into 1 inch thick medallions. Place the medallions on a cutting board and cover with a piece of wax paper then flatten each medallion slightly with the palm of your hand. Season both sides of the medallions with sea salt, freshly cracked pepper, and garlic powder, to taste.

Heat the butter and olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the medallions to the HOT skillet and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side, until golden brown and cooked through. Remove to a plate and keep warm.

Add the chicken broth, lemon juice, worcestershire sauce, and mustard to the pan along with half of the parsley. Cook, stirring with pan juices, for 1-2 minutes or until heated through. Add the pork along with any juices back to the pan and coat both sides with the sauce. Place the pork on a serving platter with a side of the sauce. Sprinkle the pork with the remaining parsley. Serve immediately. Enjoy.

 Pork Tenderloin Diane

 

Pork Tenderloin Diane

Pork Tenderloin Diane

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pork tenderloin silverskin removed and cut into 8 pieces
  • Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper to taste
  • Garlic powder to taste
  • ½ tbsp butter
  • ½ tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp chicken broth
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp Dijon-style mustard
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley minced

Instructions

  • Remove the silverskin from the pork tenderloin (click this link for instructions). Cut the tenderloin into 1 inch thick medallions. Place the medallions on a cutting board and cover with a piece of wax paper then flatten each medallion slightly with the palm of your hand. Season both sides of the medallions with sea salt, freshly cracked pepper, and garlic powder, to taste.
  • Heat the butter and olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the medallions to the HOT skillet and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side, until golden brown and cooked through. Remove to a plate and keep warm.
  • Add the chicken broth, lemon juice, worcestershire sauce, and mustard to the pan along with half of the parsley. Cook, stirring with pan juices, for 1-2 minutes or until heated through. Add the pork along with any juices back to the pan and coat both sides with the sauce. Place the pork on a serving platter with a side of the sauce. Sprinkle the pork with the remaining parsley. Serve immediately. Enjoy.
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23 Comments

  1. I love pork tenderloin but don’t make it as often as I would like. This looks delicious and it sounds yummy with rice!

  2. My MIL would love this– after we move in on Friday and I unpack, I’ll make it for them this weekend!

  3. The sauce sounds like it would be my favorite part!!! 🙂

  4. I love pork tenderloin prepared as little scallopini … this is right up my alley!

  5. I’ve been wanting a pork tenderloin and this sounds great.

  6. This looks and sounds delicious!

    I haven’t made a pork tenderloin in years. It’s one of those foods where my older son says, “Mom, you used to make this all the time.” It’s going on my list of foods to make after our cleanse is over. I’ll make sure to invite our older son, too! 🙂

  7. I have to try something that is named after me, and yes I love pork. Have a good day, Diane

  8. Peggy Recker says:

    This looks delicious. I just did a pork tenderloin in sauerkraut the other day.

  9. Excellent idea. I have always made Steak Diane with beef but your idea of using pork tenderloin ia a great one. I will definitely try this.

  10. Such a simple recipe yet I could really see it being a family favorite!

  11. I tend to forget about pork tenderloin medallions and usually cook it intact. This method and recipe make it so special occasion worthy. But then again, I think every day would be a special occasion at your table Pam!

  12. Steak Diane and steak Bearnaise are my favorites.
    Oh the sauce, I swear I always make extra and always order extra when dining out.
    Never used it on pork, but why not?
    Fabulous!
    Have a great weekend!

  13. Kim in MD says:

    My family loves pork tenderloin and I am always on the hunt for new recipes. Yum…I can’t wait to try this!

  14. Okay, this is creepy. I printed out that exact same recipe to make on or about the same day you made this. I had to make some substitutions but we loved it.
    I didn’t take pictures because it was the first meal I cooked after my surgery and was pushing it as it was.
    You and I were on the same wave length last week!

  15. i’ve never heard of this and certainly don’t know diane, but the whole result looks and sounds delicious! the amount of effort required is just about right too. 🙂

  16. I raced over here after seeing this recipe on Larry’s blog. Nice dish! I’ve cooked medallions of beef this way, breaded and loved the results. I can’t wait to try this one with that wonderful sauce. Nice to meet you and thanks for a great recipe.

  17. Absolutely LOVED this! DH and I are not fans of dijon mustard so anything that calls for dijon I usually sub spicy brown mustard. I am making this again this week we loved it so much. I served it with a Wild Rice and Broccoli Cheese casserole. Thanks for sharing!

  18. Julie Hordyk says:

    Made this for dinner with friends last night…super simple and very tasty! I think next time I will double the sauce, as it tended to reduce down to more of a glaze and I found myself wanted more.